Posts tagged Bureau of Labor Statistics

    Opinion: Amidst inflation, President Biden should refocus his efforts on expanding flexible work careers for Americans

    August 9, 2022 // Why is championing flexible work through reforms so important? Independent contractors make up a sizeable portion of the 59 million freelancers in the U.S. economy, employ tens of millions of additional workers under their contracts as small businesses, and are often the entrepreneurs that grow successful new businesses in communities. Modern Worker Empowerment Act, California Supreme Court

    Opinion: With Inflation High, Unions, Suppress Wages

    August 7, 2022 // Good luck getting a big raise if you’re in a union right now. That’s the unspoken message of a July 29 report from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. It showed that nonunion workers’ nominal pay in June was up 5.8% year over year, compared with only 3.8% for union workers’. The gap has been widening for a year. Why? Inflation. This divergence makes sense when you think of how union contracts operate. Unions negotiate long-term collective-bargaining agreements between workers and employers, with a typical contract lasting three to five years. That locks in the union’s gains but leaves it with little bargaining power or flexibility when something sudden or severe, like the current inflation, hits. So unless the contract is about to expire, union members are trapped when they need the freedom to negotiate better raises much faster.

    Antitrust and Modern U.S. Labor Markets: An Economics Perspective

    August 3, 2022 // Among the most high-profile initiatives of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) during the Biden Administration has been a focus on using antitrust law to address issues relating to economic inequality, specifically the role that corporate mergers purport to play in undermining labor market competition, and in turn harming workers.[2] Proponents of the FTC’s current approach appeal to academic analysis in support of their argument.[3] We submit that this focus is misguided, and based on flawed assumptions with respect to both the state of the labor market and the purported growth in economic inequality. Rather, we argue, when analyzed correctly, the data regarding workplace flexibility, labor market concentration, and so-called “income inequality” show that, if the FTC continues down this regulatory path, the workers the agency claims to protect will suffer the greatest harm. The application of antitrust law to the labor market is unprecedented and, perhaps more importantly, antithetical to the well-being of workers. For the reasons we explain below, it should be rejected. National Longitudinal Survey, House of Representatives Select Committee on Economic Disparity and Fairness in Growth, Executive Branch,

    Unemployment is at another historic low but 72,000 workers are still missing from the workforce

    August 1, 2022 // Minnesota is not doing too well when compared to its neighbors either — with the exception of Iowa. Wisconsin and South Dakota have all recovered their pre-pandemic workforce. North Dakota’s workforce is only 0.3 percentage points smaller. Yes, Minnesota’s unemployment rate is very low. But our shrunken workforce is no reason to celebrate. The fact that our labor force participation rate is still not budging should be a reason for concern. Department of Employment and Economic Development, DEED Commissioner Steve Grove,

    Commentary: Is the labor market really as good as the administration says?

    July 27, 2022 // Most significantly, 18 months’ worth of bonus unemployment benefits that paid most people more to stay on the sidelines than to work caused millions of people to leave the labor market. Meanwhile, Washington stimulated consumer and business demand for goods and services by flooding the economy with trillions of dollars in so-called COVID-19 relief — about half of which was money printed by the Federal Reserve.

    Opinion: An unprecedented labor shortage

    July 26, 2022 // There are 50% more job openings today than at any time before the pandemic. The unemployment rate is near a half-century low. So how did that happen? A combination of government policies that simultaneously reduced the supply of workers and stimulated demand for goods and services. There are 755,000 fewer people employed today than at the start of the pandemic, despite an increase of 4.2 million in the population of people ages 16 and older. employment-to-population ratio, labor force decline, Social Security, welfare-without-work, federal subsidies, Recognized Apprenticeship Programs, Heritage Foundation’s Grover M. Hermann Center for the Federal Budget, education alternatives, encourage flexible work

    OPM, NTEU offer recommendations to improve relationships between agencies, unions

    July 22, 2022 // Earlier this year, the White House Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment made 70 recommendations to enhance federal unions, including providing information on unions to federal employees and improving transparency. labor-management relations, Tony Reardon, Tim Curry, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, Obama and Clinton administrations, Frontline employees

    Department of Labor Rule – Coalition Letter

    July 22, 2022 // The January 7, 2021 DOL rule has provided clarity to the decades-old economic realities test for the modern workforce, helping to apply determinations in light of the different types of work and technologies used to work and connect with customers today. Instead of removing this clear and sensible standard and attempting to diminish or eliminate independent contracting, we urge you to preserve paths to self-employment that allow tens of millions of working Americans, parents of children with special needs, workers seeking career changes, disabled workers and workers caring for disabled family members, and entrepreneurs growing small businesses of their own to pursue work on their own terms. Brent Wm. Gardner, Brandon Arnold, Grover Norquist, Michael J. Lotito, Greg Sindelar, Krisztina Pusok, Ph. D., The American Consumer, American Legislative Exchange Council, Lisa B. Nelson, Center for Freedom and Prosperity, Andrew F. Quinlan, Robert Fellner, Heather R. Higgins, Independent Women's Voice, Bethany Marcum, Alaska Policy Forum, Mike Stenhouse, Mike Hruby, New Jobs America, Paul Gessing, Rio Grande Foundation, Seton Motley, Less Government, Robert Alt, Steve Delie, Brian Minnich, Daniel Erspamer, Pelican Institute, Eric Peterson, Pelican Center for Technology and Innovation, Randy Hicks, Georgia Center for Opportunity, Alliance for Opportunity, Jeffrey Mazzella, Center for Individual Freedom, Douglas Carswell, Mississippi Center for Public Policy, David Williams, Taxpayers Protection Alliance, Ryan Ellis, Center for a Free Economy, Phil Kerpen, American Commitment, James Taylor, The Heartland Institute, Adam Brandon, FreedomWorks, Elaine Parker, Job Creators Network Foundation, Brandon Dutcher, Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, Thomas A. Schatz, Citizens Against Government Waste, Justin Owen, Beacon Center of Tennessee, Matthew Kandrach, Consumer Action for a Strong Economy, Charles Mitchell, Commonwealth Foundation, James L. Martin, 60 Plus Association, Saulius “Saul” Anuzis, 60 Plus Association,

    Union efforts, unfair labor charges spike in US

    July 15, 2022 // “The NLRB is processing the most cases it has seen in years with the lowest staffing levels in the past six decades. Our dedicated staff, especially in our 48 field offices, are handling unsustainable caseloads. The Agency urgently needs more resources to process petitions and conduct elections, investigate unfair labor practice charges, and obtain full remedies for workers whose labor rights have been violated,” said NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo.

    Opinion: Biden must reverse course and protect independent contractors

    June 17, 2022 // With this new rulemaking period, the administration has a chance to turn the page on its stridently anti-independent contractor stance. Any new rules should protect the right of Americans to make a living outside of a traditional employment relationship. Under current law, there are two ways an individual can have a relationship with someone that is paying you. The first is an employee, where a person that is paying the individual has total control over how, when, and where the work is being done.