Posts tagged Public Sector Workers

    COMMENTARY America’s seeing a historic surge in worker organizing. Here’s how to sustain it

    September 7, 2022 // Likewise, strikes by public-sector workers in the 1960s produced state-level statutes endorsing collective bargaining. Similar policy changes will be needed to sustain contemporary worker efforts, both by fixing the basics of existing labor law to ensure that workers who want collective bargaining are successful in achieving contracts, and by opening up labor law to new forms of worker voice in workplace affairs and corporate governance. But legal changes won’t lead the process. As in the past, policymakers will respond to pressure for change coming from the workforce, a broad base of public interest groups, and ultimately some in the business community.

    Labor Unions Are Not in a ‘Resurgence’

    July 21, 2022 // Nearly all major unions in the “birthplace of organized labor” have lost a huge number of members. The Michigan Education Association is down 31%. Michigan Teamsters show a loss of 32%. The state AFSCME branch is down nearly 50%. And SEIU has lost almost two-thirds. A decline in manufacturing employment drives some of this loss. But over the past decade, several states began offering workers a choice about whether they need to join a union when their workplaces are unionized. And public sector workers in all 50 states now have this right. This choice means many are choosing to leave.

    A Persistent Cook Serves Up a Winning Recipe for the First Amendment

    July 19, 2022 // An unexpected champion of the First Amendment against public-sector unions may inspire other Janus-curious government workers. Tina Curtis, the lead cook for the New Haven, Conn., Board of Education, may not have figured herself to be a First Amendment warrior. But by prevailing over her government-union bosses in what may prove to be an important Janus-rights case, she has shown herself to be exactly that. Curtis v. Hotel & Restaurant Employees & Bartenders Union, Local 217, AFL-CIO,

    Jousting with management? Medieval Times cast may join NJ’s growing unionized workforce Friday

    July 15, 2022 // On Friday afternoon, 42 workers at the Bergen County dinner theater will decide whether to join the American Guild of Variety Artists, which represents performers including the Rockettes and the members of Cirque du Soleil. The vote follows a national wave of collective organizing and an uptick in unionization rates in New Jersey. Food service workers, retail employees, even budtenders in the medical and recreational cannabis markets are getting organized. Medieval Times employees said the union will represent the knights, squires, trumpeters and other performers. It would represent the stable hands, who care for the horses, as well. Servers and food staff would not be included in the bargaining unit. New Jersey Medieval Times, Zaire Wood, May report by the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations, Susanne Doris,

    ‘Workers are winning’: Colorado law hailed as important victory for public sector workers

    June 13, 2022 // The bill, although a compromise from a previously proposed bill that would have granted the right to strike to about 250,000 public sector workers throughout Colorado, was hailed as one of the most significant expansions of collective bargaining rights for public sector workers in recent years. It goes into effect next year. “All across the nation, workers are fighting tooth and nail to get a seat at the table, and they’re winning. We see it in Starbucks coffee shops. We see it in cultural institutions, and now we’re seeing it in Colorado, where county workers will have the freedom to negotiate to improve their lives and strengthen the public services they provide,” said the AFSCME president, Lee Saunders, in response to the bill’s passage. Brittany Williams, El Paso county, Colorado, Jared Polis, Collective Bargaining for Counties bill, Lee Saunders, AFL-CIO, AFSCME Local 1335,

    Now Is the Time for Unions to Go on the Offensive

    June 7, 2022 // But, thankfully, a growing “militant minority” of labor advocates are calling for a more aggressive and offensive stance, and an implicit rejection of fortress unionism. Those forces argue for a dramatic increase in spending on organizing campaigns, a boost in the funding of alternative labor groups and independent unions, and more militant and disruptive labor activities, such as legal and illegal strikes, secondary boycott activities, and defying restrictive court injunctions on picketing and protest. May Day,