Posts tagged ports

    Why Railway Unions Oppose the Deal Biden Helped Arrange

    September 14, 2022 // The eventual proposal the PEB came up with seems on its surface pretty good for the workers: a 24 percent wage increase through 2024, with another 14 percent wage increase effective immediately. That would put the average pay for a rail worker at $110,000 per year by the end of the agreement, not counting benefits. About 10 of the 15 unions have taken the deal, but two of the large ones Sheet Metal Air Rail Transportation and the Teamsters Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen have balked. They represent an estimated 66,000 workers and are demanding better sick leave and attendance policies.

    Exclusive: Biden’s emergency board calls for railroad wage hikes to resolve contract talks

    August 18, 2022 // U.S. President Joe Biden's emergency board tasked with helping major freight railroads and unions end a contract negotiation stalemate proposed on Tuesday annual wage increases of between 4% and 7% through 2024, according to a report seen by Reuters. The board also recommended in its 119-page report set to be made public as early as Wednesday a 3% retroactive increase for 2020 and 3.5% for 2021, when the rail workers did not have a contract, along with five $1,000 annual bonuses and an additional paid day off.

    CALIFORNIA; OPINION: WHEN WILL GOVERNMENT UNIONS STAND UP FOR ALL WORKERS?

    July 20, 2022 // Government unions in California have the power to make changes that help everyone, instead of just their members. For starters, they can stop marching in solidarity with the teachers union, which is incorrigible. Then they can find common ground on at least some issues with conservatives, while agreeing to disagree on others. They might take on the environmentalists, by supporting spending on new water supply infrastructure and by helping to restore California’s timber industry.

    Hundreds of truckers block Oakland terminal access to protest AB5

    July 19, 2022 // By Monday afternoon, the SSA, TraPac and Everport terminals announced there would be no night shift hours as the protesting owner-operators were only allowing around two company trucks per hour into the terminal gates throughout the day. On average, 250 trucks an hour would flow through the terminals on a typical work day. Matt Schrap, CEO of the Harbor Trucking Association, who was in Oakland on Monday, lauded the demonstration. owner-operators, Kimberly Sulsar-Campos, vice president of Oakland-based Iraheta Bros. Trucking, Rafael Quintero, Joe Rajkovacz, director of governmental affairs for the Western States Trucking Association, Employment Development Department [EDD] audit, Larry Dhaliwal, LDT Transport, Robert Bernardo, TraPac, Bill Aboudi, drayage trucks

    Biden averts freight railroad strike – for now

    July 18, 2022 // The presidential board can only make nonbinding recommendations on the railroad contracts, but those will serve as the basis for a new round of negotiations that could yield a contract that has eluded the railroads since talks began more than two years ago. Even if those efforts fail, Congress would likely intervene to prevent a strike. Lawmakers could impose terms on the railroads and their 12 unions at that point or take other action to keep the trains moving. The National Carriers’ Conference Committee that represents Union Pacific, BNSF, CSX, Norfolk Southern, Kansas City Southern and other railroads said it believes the wage increases railroads are offering are fair based on other recent major labor agreements, but the unions say none of the offers so far do enough to offset inflation or reflect the current worker shortages. Plus, the railroads want workers to pay more of their health insurance costs, which the unions say would eat up most, if not all, of the proposed raises. Rob Benedict, American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, Brendan Branon, Dennis Pierce, Jeremy Ferguson,

    Already strained supply chain at risk in ongoing port labor talks

    June 22, 2022 // Both Tirschwell and Larian point out that it wouldn't take a strike or a management lockout to slow or stop the flow of cargo. In the past, union members have slowed cargo simply by following strictly the terms of their existing contact, rather than trying to work most effectively. "Maybe they won't go on strike, but they can slow down everything," said Larian, the toymaker CEO. "A strike is very unlikely. A lockout is very unlikely," said Tirschwell. "But there's a definite possibility of an industrial action that disrupts the flow of cargo. That's what happened for six months in 2014 and 2015." Jim McKenna, Isaac Larian, Peter Tirschwell,

    What West Coast ports’ labor negotiations mean for your packages

    May 27, 2022 // The employers’ right to automate their operations has become a prominent issue in the contract. The 2002 deal introduced new technologies such as scanners and character-recognition technology, while the 2008 pact explicitly authorized automation. Last year, Total Terminals International LLC announced its intention to fully automate its Long Beach operations, a project the ILWU strongly opposed. This would make it San Pedro Bay’s fourth terminal with some automation out of the port complex’s 14 hubs.