Posts tagged Labor shortage

    Commentary: Is the labor market really as good as the administration says?

    July 27, 2022 // Most significantly, 18 months’ worth of bonus unemployment benefits that paid most people more to stay on the sidelines than to work caused millions of people to leave the labor market. Meanwhile, Washington stimulated consumer and business demand for goods and services by flooding the economy with trillions of dollars in so-called COVID-19 relief — about half of which was money printed by the Federal Reserve.

    Opinion: An unprecedented labor shortage

    July 26, 2022 // There are 50% more job openings today than at any time before the pandemic. The unemployment rate is near a half-century low. So how did that happen? A combination of government policies that simultaneously reduced the supply of workers and stimulated demand for goods and services. There are 755,000 fewer people employed today than at the start of the pandemic, despite an increase of 4.2 million in the population of people ages 16 and older. employment-to-population ratio, labor force decline, Social Security, welfare-without-work, federal subsidies, Recognized Apprenticeship Programs, Heritage Foundation’s Grover M. Hermann Center for the Federal Budget, education alternatives, encourage flexible work

    Department of Labor Rule – Coalition Letter

    July 22, 2022 // The January 7, 2021 DOL rule has provided clarity to the decades-old economic realities test for the modern workforce, helping to apply determinations in light of the different types of work and technologies used to work and connect with customers today. Instead of removing this clear and sensible standard and attempting to diminish or eliminate independent contracting, we urge you to preserve paths to self-employment that allow tens of millions of working Americans, parents of children with special needs, workers seeking career changes, disabled workers and workers caring for disabled family members, and entrepreneurs growing small businesses of their own to pursue work on their own terms. Brent Wm. Gardner, Brandon Arnold, Grover Norquist, Michael J. Lotito, Greg Sindelar, Krisztina Pusok, Ph. D., The American Consumer, American Legislative Exchange Council, Lisa B. Nelson, Center for Freedom and Prosperity, Andrew F. Quinlan, Robert Fellner, Heather R. Higgins, Independent Women's Voice, Bethany Marcum, Alaska Policy Forum, Mike Stenhouse, Mike Hruby, New Jobs America, Paul Gessing, Rio Grande Foundation, Seton Motley, Less Government, Robert Alt, Steve Delie, Brian Minnich, Daniel Erspamer, Pelican Institute, Eric Peterson, Pelican Center for Technology and Innovation, Randy Hicks, Georgia Center for Opportunity, Alliance for Opportunity, Jeffrey Mazzella, Center for Individual Freedom, Douglas Carswell, Mississippi Center for Public Policy, David Williams, Taxpayers Protection Alliance, Ryan Ellis, Center for a Free Economy, Phil Kerpen, American Commitment, James Taylor, The Heartland Institute, Adam Brandon, FreedomWorks, Elaine Parker, Job Creators Network Foundation, Brandon Dutcher, Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, Thomas A. Schatz, Citizens Against Government Waste, Justin Owen, Beacon Center of Tennessee, Matthew Kandrach, Consumer Action for a Strong Economy, Charles Mitchell, Commonwealth Foundation, James L. Martin, 60 Plus Association, Saulius “Saul” Anuzis, 60 Plus Association,

    Kern Medical workers announce 3-day strike over ‘unfair labor practice’

    July 12, 2022 // Kern Medical workers announced a three-day strike starting July 26 citing concerns over what they called “a series of unfair labor practice” including employee and in-patient safety concerns, staffing shortages and low wages. Workers announced that if the hospital administration does not meet their demands, they will “engage in a three-day unfair labor practice strike.”

    Short-staffed hotels are hiring robots — and labor unions are pushing back

    July 6, 2022 // A handful of hotels across the US – from the Mandarin Oriental in Boston to a Holiday Inn Express in Redwood City, Calif. – have begun turning to robots to provide guest services usually performed by human employees. Labor unions don’t find the idea of robots working at a hotel funny, much less robot jokes. Organizers fear the budding army of automatons, which currently numbers at least 200 nationwide, is threatening to grow and replace dues-paying members. The issue is bubbling up in the hospitality industry even as it has lately sparked division in other sectors amid a nationwide labor shortage. That includes talks between port operators and West Coast dock workers whose labor contract expired on July 1. army of automatons, Relay Robotics, American Hotel & Lodging Association, Vaughn Davis, Dream Hollywood, Bear Robotics, Luma Hotel, non-union hotels, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Boston, Hawaii, Rich Maroko,

    12 nursing homes in Western New York plan for 1-day strike

    July 5, 2022 // The largest health care workers union, 1199 SEIU, will hold one-day strikes all across Western New York later this month to demand higher wages. Autumn View Health Care Facility, Buffalo Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing, Elderwood at Lockport, Elderwood at Williamsville,Ellicott Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing, Fiddler’s Green Manor Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, Garden Gate Health Care Facility, Gowanda Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, Humboldt House Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, Newfane Rehabilitation & Health Center, North Gate Health Care Facility, Seneca Health Care Center, Grace Bogdanove, April Stonebraker,

    4 Atlantic City casinos reach deal with union, avert strike

    July 5, 2022 // The main union for Atlantic City casino workers reached agreements on new contracts with four casinos on Thursday, providing for what one worker called "big raises" and labor peace that will avoid a strike on Fourth of July weekend, one of the casinos’ busiest of the year. Local 54 of the Unite Here union reached tentative agreements with the Borgata, which is owned by MGM Resorts International, and three Caesars Entertainment casinos: Caesars, Harrah’s and the Tropicana. Ronnette Lark, internet gambling, sports betting revenue,

    ‘People are walking off the job’: workers blame American Red Cross for US blood shortage

    June 28, 2022 // But workers at the organization say the shortage is being caused by widespread staffing issues. Low pay and understaffing are causing problems, and workers say they often have to turn away donors due to backed-up lines, and that management has not supported workers or donors enough to resolve these issues. A document from a January meeting revealed that a Red Cross senior account manager, Joseph Shockley, told hospital representatives that labor and staffing issues have driven blood supply concerns, cautioning: “We don’t want to drive donors to places that are understaffed that turn donors away – that becomes frustrating to donors.” Joseph Shockley, Darryl Ford, blood drives, coalition of labor unions, Bobbie Terrell,

    Opinion: Apprenticeships, Not College, Can Help Reduce Unemployment

    June 25, 2022 // We estimate that the entirety of our current employment gap is driven by people without children under 18 at home and most predominantly by young adults. While total employment is down 0.28% since the start of the pandemic, employment among 20- to 24-year-olds is down 3.7%. Claudia Goldin, Mazda Toyota Manufacturing, employment gap, Huntsville, Alabama, National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, Pathways, Industry-Recognized Apprenticeship Programs, IRAP model,

    Louisville public defenders clash with management over union effort

    June 7, 2022 // It is increasingly common for the people charged with upholding that constitutional guarantee to turn to organizing their offices. In April 2020, the American Bar Association reported that unionization among public defenders was on the rise. Cities such as Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and Lancaster, Pennsylvania have seen their public defenders move toward unionization. Jefferson County, Ben Basil, Leo Smith, Kentucky Bar Association, Kentucky Supreme Court, Cassie Chambers Armstrong, Lexington Herald-Leader, American Bar Association,