Posts tagged Washington

    Professional salaried workers at Walla Walla Community College look to unionize

    March 7, 2023 // “The bluntest way (to describe professional exempt employees) would be middle management,” she said. “They are typically — not always, but often — coordinators, managers, directors.” When it comes to representing people in those roles, securing better working conditions and recognition tend to be at the top of the priority list, Strickland said. That’s been the case at other colleges and universities where similar groups have formed, she said.

    Which States Are Best for Remote Workers?

    March 2, 2023 // Remote work has proliferated as a work arrangement since the COVID-19 pandemic began in 2020. While its popularity has declined since its Spring 2020 peak, remote work remains far more common today than it was before the pandemic (see Figure 1). Research from Nicholas Bloom and others found that last month, nearly 13 percent of workers were fully remote, and an additional 28 percent worked in a hybrid arrangement.

    UPS plans to lay off some of its controversial weekend drivers, union reps say, as delivery companies downsize for post-pandemic life

    February 14, 2023 // The affected position, according to the union, is the "22.4" driver, named for the section of the contract that created the position. These drivers work Tuesday through Saturday and top out at $30.64 per hour, while regular drivers can reach $42. The Teamsters see these drivers as "second class" and now regret that the position was approved in their controversial 2018 contract. Under the existing contract, affected drivers have the right to work from another location or work two weekly shifts handling packages inside UPS buildings instead of driving, and no so-called Regular Package Drivers can be laid off before a 22.4 driver, according to the 804's post. A UPS spokesperson said the company is shifting its capacity to respond to customer demand.

    FP SCOTUS Predictions: Will the Supreme Court Make it Easier to Hold Unions Liable for Strike Misconduct?

    February 2, 2023 // The NLRA protects concerted activities for “mutual aid or protection” and expressly preserves the right to strike. As a Constitutional principle, the NLRA preempts state law claims based on “arguably protected” conduct. However, violence and deliberate efforts to damage property are not protected activity. Under SCOTUS’s established Garmon doctrine, the NLRB must first review any case when employees engage in activity arguably protected by the NLRA. The rationale is that the agency, with its specialized knowledge and experience with labor-management disputes, is better equipped than the judiciary to determine whether activity is within the parameters of, or contrary to, the NLRA. If the Board finds the union’s action is protected, state courts are left without jurisdiction over the matter. However, if the Board finds the NLRA does not protect the conduct, the employer may file a state lawsuit against the union to recover damages.

    UNIONIZE MANAGEMENT? WASHINGTON STATE IS CONSIDERING IT.

    January 19, 2023 // WMS employees earn up to $300,456 per year, more than three times the salary of the average working Washingtonian and 23 percent more than the highest-paid state department secretaries. Historically, the Legislature has consistently increased the salaries of WMS employees at the same rate it has increased wages for union-represented state workers. In terms of compensation, the only reason it would be in the interest of WMS employees to unionize would be to attempt to secure wage increases larger than those negotiated by the unions representing general government civil service employees. But given that state funds are finite, this necessarily pits managers’ interests against those of the employees they supervise.

    Forgery Cases Give Supreme Court Opportunity to Hold Unions Accountable for Shady Tactics

    January 18, 2023 // aken collectively, the forgery cases clearly suggest a coordinated strategy on the part of unions panicked into breaking the law at the prospect of losing hundreds of millions of dollars in dues money when members they’ve spent decades preying on discover that the power to decide about workplace representation has always been in their own hands. The Supreme Court made its intentions in Janus crystal clear. Public employees have an iron-clad First Amendment right to keep their jobs even if they choose to have nothing to do with a union.

    Michigan could become first state in nearly 60 years to ditch ‘right-to-work’ law

    January 13, 2023 // Michigan was not the first state to enact right-to-work. But it is a state steeped in labor history now poised to become the first state in nearly 60 years to ditch such a law, with Democrats controlling the executive and legislative branches of state government for the first time in four decades.

    Forgery Cases Give Supreme Court Opportunity to Hold Unions Accountable for Shady Tactics

    January 11, 2023 // Taken collectively, the forgery cases clearly suggest a coordinated strategy on the part of unions panicked into breaking the law at the prospect of losing hundreds of millions of dollars in dues money when members they’ve spent decades preying on discover that the power to decide about workplace representation has always been in their own hands. The Supreme Court made its intentions in Janus crystal clear. Public employees have an iron-clad First Amendment right to keep their jobs even if they choose to have nothing to do with a union.

    THREE LAWSUITS, ALL INVOLVING UNION FORGERY, APPEALED TO SUPREME COURT

    December 22, 2022 // In all three cases, dues continued to be deducted from the plaintiffs’ paychecks long after they requested to opt out because the union claimed they had signed a membership form stipulating they could only leave during a two-week annual window. In fact, none of the workers had signed any such authorization and, when the unions were forced to provide documentation, each turned out to be a crude forgery. Zielinski v. SEIU 503, Wright v. SEIU 503, Cindy Ochoa,