Posts tagged Office of Congressional Workplace Rights

    Opinion: Newsom, Like Biden, Believes Selling out to Unions Is His Path to the Presidency

    August 5, 2022 // Newsom’s resume is littered with union sellouts — which goes a long way toward explaining how he’s managed to turn the Golden State into an open cesspool — but the most recent was his approval on June 27 of a state budget that has the potential to force taxpayers to subsidize union dues while handing California’s labor unions an unprecedented handout to shore up their Janus-depleted finances. The so-called “Workers’ Fairness Tax Credit” would convert union dues from a tax deduction to a tax credit. The budget earmarks $200 million to “begin” a policy of paying union members for paying union dues John Moorlach, Jon Coupal, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers’ Association, Dan Walters, CalMatters, California Labor Federation, Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher, House of Representatives,

    Will California Legislature allow its workers to unionize?

    July 26, 2022 // Just last month, for instance, language was slipped into a very lengthy budget trailer bill declaring the state’s intention to provide union members who do not itemize their income tax deductions with a refundable tax credit offsetting their dues. In effect, under the “Workers Tax Fairness Credit,” as it’s dubbed, taxpayers would underwrite some or all of the dues members pay to their unions. Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher, Assemblyman Mark Stone, Senate Labor, Public Employment and Retirement Committee, Assembly Bill 1577, sexual harassment, HR1096, Rep. Ro Khanna,

    Unanswered questions surround unionizing effort by congressional staffers

    July 26, 2022 // For starters, congressional offices have different budgets from which to draw salaries for staff — and those amounts are fixed once decided annually. That makes bargaining across multiple personal member offices difficult, as even ideologically aligned members of Congress may have differences in their personnel budget and staffing structure. Rep. Barry Loudermilk, House Compensation and Diversity Study, Census Bureau, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Authorizing congressional unions won’t end Democrats’ labor troubles

    May 17, 2022 // Earlier this year, after the Democrat-controlled Washington state Legislature quietly killed a pair of bills extending collective bargaining privileges to legislative aides, about 100 Democrat staffers staged an unprecedented sickout. Facing a PR nightmare, panicked Democrat leadership quickly reintroduced and passed legislation allowing staff to unionize and bargain, but not until 2024, after a new “Office of State Legislative Labor Relations” spends millions of taxpayer dollars trying to figure out how to make it work in practice.

    FLRA Control Returns to Democrats After Senate Confirms Biden Nominee

    May 16, 2022 // With the addition of another Democrat at the FLRA with a background of working for unions, federal agencies can anticipate a change in the direction from that which emerged under the Trump administration. The approach will be to expand bargaining and the role of unions in agencies rather than focusing on the prior approach of seeking to limit the role of unions and emphasizing “efficient government”.

    House tees up vote on union protections for staffers

    May 9, 2022 // The resolution introduced by Rep. Andy Levin would address that by finishing a process the House began more than a quarter-century ago. When lawmakers passed the Congressional Accountability Act in 1995, they essentially removed a legislative branch exception to numerous federal statutes, including labor laws. But the House never took the final step of approving regulations issued by the Office of Compliance, now the Office of Congressional Workplace Rights.

    Does Democrats’ support for unions extend to their own employees?

    April 22, 2022 // The CWU, a group of staffers that launched a union drive earlier this year, wants the House to vote on a resolution guaranteeing staffers protections as soon as next week. Currently, the Congressional Accountability Act allows staffers to organize, but doesn’t offer them any shield from retaliation, meaning staffers could be fired and blacklisted if they do so. Thus far, Pelosi’s office has not commented on when a floor vote could be scheduled on the resolution.