Posts tagged gig workers

    Fraud had ‘significant’ role in $163 billion leak from pandemic-era unemployment system

    May 30, 2022 // More than $163 billion in benefits likely leaked from the unemployment system during the pandemic, with a “significant portion” attributable to fraud, according to a U.S. Department of Labor report.

    Who’s the Real Author Behind Seattle’s “PayUp” Legislation?

    May 19, 2022 // One illuminating display of Wilson’s influence was an October 2021 letter sent by Councilmember Herbold to several gig companies. In the letter, she scolded the representatives for their concerns with the PayUp legislation: “I’m disappointed that you’ve not expressed the depth of, nor raised all your issues during our weekly calls.”

    The Employee Rights Act Puts American Workers, Not Union Bosses, in the Driver’s Seat

    April 13, 2022 // The Employee Rights Act contains several other provisions to protect workers from union intimidation. The bill criminalizes union threats in the workplace and bans unions from using personal employee data for anything unrelated to campaigns, taking Big Labor’s most aggressive and unethical tactics off the table. The bill also prohibits union “salting,” a tactic where a union pays an individual to apply for a job within a company that has not yet been unionized. Instead of becoming a productive employee, the “salt” is there to organize a union and be Big Labor’s mole on the inside.

    To Help Workers, Unions and Democrats Should Support Scott’s ERA

    April 13, 2022 // The ERA’s policies are wildly popular. Recent polling shows that 70% of those polled – including 76% of individuals in union households – believe that workers should have the right to a secret ballot. Other major provisions – including the right to withhold dues from political spending, privacy protections, and the criminalization of union threats – poll at an average favorability of 70%.

    BACKGROUNDER: Employee Rights Act

    March 26, 2022 // The Employee Rights (ERA) Act was introduced this week by Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC). The legislation allows employees to receive merit-based pay raises outside of the wage scales set by their union’s collective bargaining agreement, guarantees the right to a secret ballot in union elections, provides new privacy protections, allows workers to decertify a union more easily, provides legal clarity for small business owners and gig workers, and more.

    Senators Introduce Employee Rights Act of 2022

    March 25, 2022 // The Employee Rights Act of 2022 is also co-sponsored by Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Ranking Member Richard Burr (R-North Carolina), Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky), and Senators John Thune (R-South Dakota), John Barrasso (R-Wyoming), Mike Braun (R-Indiana), Roger Marshall (R-Kansas), Jerry Moran (R-Kansas), Tommy Tuberville (R-Alabama), Jim Risch (R-Idaho), John Cornyn (R-Texas), Steve Daines (R-Montana), Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyoming), Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Mississippi), Bill Hagerty (R-Tennessee), John Boozman (R-Arkansas), Roger Wicker (R-Mississippi), Thom Tillis (R-North Carolina), Kevin Cramer (R-North Dakota), Mitt Romney (R-Utah), Tom Cotton (R-Arkansas), Jim Inhofe (R-Oklahoma) and Ron Johnson (R-Wisconsin). Representative Rick Allen (R-Georgia) is introducing companion legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives.

    60 Plus Association Alaska Policy Forum ALEC Action American Business Conference American Experiment American Hotel & Lodging Association Americans for Prosperity. Americans for Tax Reform Asian American Hotel Owners Association Associated Equipment Distributors Beacon Impact Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce California Business and Industrial Alliance California Policy Center Center for Individual Freedom Center for Union Facts Ceramic Tile Distributors Association choose its representation Commonwealth Foundation Consumer Technology Association Council for Citizens Against Government Waste Employee Rights Act Employee Rights Act of 2022 encourage job creation entrepreneurs evolving workforce Family Business Coalition federal government mandates flexible work options Foodservice Equipment Distributors Association franchisees Freedom Foundation FreedomWorks gig workers Goldwater Institute Heating Air-conditioning Heritage Action for America Hispanic Leadership Fund HR Policy Association Idaho Idaho Right to Work Independent Bakers Association independent contractors Independent Electrical Contractors Independent Women’s Voice Institute for the American Worker International Association of Plastics Distribution International Franchise Association Job Creators Network job-killing union agreements Kansas Policy Institute Littler Workplace Policy Institute Lubbock Chamber of Commerce Mackinac Center for Public Policy Metals Service Center Institute National Association of Electrical Distributors National Association of Manufacturers National Association of Wholesaler-Distributors National Fastener Distributors Association National Federation of Independent Businesses National Marine Distributors Association National Ready Mix Concrete Association National Restaurant Association National Retail Federation National Taxpayers Union Nevada Policy Research Institute one-size-fits all mandates Open Competition Center Outdoor Power Equipment and Engine Service Association Palmetto Promise Institute protection reduce barriers Retail Industry Leaders Association Rhode Island Center for Freedom and Prosperity right-to-work Senator Mike Crapo Senator Tim Scott Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council small businesses South Carolina Chamber of Commerce Taxpayers Protection Alliance Texas Public Policy Foundation The Club for Growth The John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy The John Locke Foundation The Libre Initiative U.S. Chamber of Commerce Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce

    The Bureau for Labor Statistics data only reported 16 strikes in 2021. A new database argues there were 14x as many

    March 1, 2022 // Prior to 1982, the Bureau for Labor Statistics (BLS) reported on all work stoppages that involved at least six workers and lasted for a full shift or longer. Reagan-era budget cuts changed its methodology, and for the past four decades, the institution has only reported on work stoppages it considers “major” — those involving at least 1,000 workers.