Posts tagged big labor

    The National Labor Relations Board is trying to silence employer speech

    December 5, 2022 // The NLRB recently filed a complaint against Andy Jassy, CEO of Amazon, claiming a statement he made on CNBC constituted an unfair labor practice. When asked about the ongoing campaign to unionize Amazon, Jassy said: “It’s employees’ choice whether or not they want to join a union. We happen to think they’re better off not doing so, for a couple of reasons at least. You know, first, at a place like Amazon that empowers employees, if they see something they can do better for customers or for themselves, they can go meet in a room, decide how [to] change it — and change it. That type of empowerment doesn’t happen when you have unions. It’s much more bureaucratic, it’s much slower. I also think people are better off having direct connections with their managers.”

    NY POST Opinion: Union Joe suddenly turns into Union-Buster-in-Chief — to save himself

    December 1, 2022 // With Americans already facing Bidenflation and a potentially painful recession, a rail strike would utterly slam the nation’s economy — and his legacy. “I am calling on Congress to pass legislation immediately to adopt the Tentative Agreement [reached in September by] railroad workers and operators,” Biden said Monday, insisting no “path to resolve the dispute at the bargaining table” exists. Hmm. Just this year he was backing unionization of Amazon workers, warning, “Amazon, here we come. Watch.” Last year, too, he pushed unionization drives and praised organized labor for winning workers better terms. His proposed Protecting the Right to Organize Act and American Jobs Plan aimed to unionize practically the entire US workforce (by nixing states’ right-to-work laws, for example).

    National Right to Work Foundation Submits Comments Opposing Biden Rule to Give Unions Control Over Taxpayer-Funded Contracts

    October 18, 2022 // Today, the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation filed comments opposing a Federal Acquisition Regulatory (FAR) Council proposed rule to block non-union workers from working on federal contracts. The rule, which implements President Biden’s Executive Order 14063, requires federal agencies to impose PLAs (Project Labor Agreements) on contractors and employees who work on federal construction projects that will cost $35 million or more. PLAs mandate that, to work on a construction project, contractors’ workers must be under union monopoly control. Given that around 80 percent of construction workers and contractors have opted against unionization, this union-only requirement discriminates against the vast majority of America’s construction workers. This also drives up the costs to taxpayers due to inefficient union work rules that union officials insist on.

    Sacramento-area Pine Creek Care Center Nurses Overwhelmingly Vote to Oust Unwanted Teamsters Union

    September 23, 2022 // Federal labor board data show that workers across the country are increasingly likely to be involved in efforts to remove unions from workplaces Just a month before Chand and her colleagues’ successful decertification vote, Foundation attorneys aided nurses at Mayo Clinic in Mankato, Minnesota, in their successful effort to throw out the unpopular Minnesota Nurses Association (MNA) union from their workplace. About the same time, nurses from the St. James, Minnesota, branch of Mayo Clinic voted to decertify American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 65 union officials by a nearly 9-to-1 margin, also with Foundation legal assistance.

    Dems Desperate to Deliver Last-Minute Favors to Big Labor Bosses

    September 13, 2022 // The NLRB waited 23 months – long after it had gathered the relevant information to issue a complaint – to file the preliminary injunction. The NLRB waited until a week before the JKF8 vote to tip the scales the hardest for the union – and admitted as much in its court filings. Not only did the NLRB intervene at the last minute to improperly influence the employees’ vote, but it did so to protect a workplace bully. While the left claims to care about worker’s rights, clearly only certain workers’ rights matter. The Biden NLRB is willing to promote workplace harassment so long as it furthers Big Labor’s goals. The Amazon case is one of many examples of the supposedly impartial NLRB delivering for Big Labor. Instead of pushing proposals like the PRO Act that would hurt workers, Congress should conduct robust oversight hearings into the NLRB’s conduct.

    Surging Support For Union Work? Workers Seek Out Freelance Options More

    September 7, 2022 // The same survey found a majority of non-unionized workers have no intention of joining a union, despite their alleged touted benefits. 58% of non-union respondents said they’re “not interested at all” in joining a union, compared to 11% that said they’re “extremely interested.” Moreover, the survey also found that union workers (27%) are “less engaged” in the workplace compared to their non-unionized counterparts (33%).

    What unions don’t tell you about collective bargaining

    August 17, 2022 // For instance, after unionization it takes an average of 465 days to sign the first contract. So, after that hard-fought effort, it will probably be a while until any of the union’s promises are realized (if at all). Once there is a contract, don’t be surprised if it doesn’t include everything the union promised. Collective bargaining is just that–bargaining. The union won’t know what they can achieve through collective bargaining until they actually sit down at the table. On top of that, contracts typically expire after three or four years, limiting flexibility. That might be why non-union pay is higher than unionized pay; wage increases can’t be quickly implemented because they need to go through the collective bargaining process first.

    A Persistent Cook Serves Up a Winning Recipe for the First Amendment

    July 19, 2022 // An unexpected champion of the First Amendment against public-sector unions may inspire other Janus-curious government workers. Tina Curtis, the lead cook for the New Haven, Conn., Board of Education, may not have figured herself to be a First Amendment warrior. But by prevailing over her government-union bosses in what may prove to be an important Janus-rights case, she has shown herself to be exactly that. Curtis v. Hotel & Restaurant Employees & Bartenders Union, Local 217, AFL-CIO,

    Rep. Virginia Foxx: NLRB’s Bad Behavior

    July 18, 2022 // “By eviscerating the secret ballot, a hallmark of democratic elections, card check makes workers more vulnerable to harassment from union organizers. Don’t forget, a prominent union leader testified before the House Education and Labor Committee that unions need workers’ personal information to harass them ‘at the grocery store,’ or in their own home to pressure them into supporting the union. His admission tells you all you need to know about the political hackery of unions today. “The Biden-appointed NLRB General Counsel has also challenged longstanding precedent regarding employers’ right to educate their employees about the downsides of union representation. General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo believes that such efforts are ‘at odds’ with the ‘fundamental labor laws’ of this country.

    Biden NLRB Counsel Rewrites Labor Law History

    July 18, 2022 // Prior to the approval of the Taft-Hartley amendments, Big Labor bosses would often present to employers pro-union cards purportedly signed by a majority of their workers and demand to be granted monopoly-bargaining privileges over those employees based on those cards alone, without a vote. Recognizing that many employees signed so-called “union authorization” cards only after being “cajoled, coerced and intimidated,” and in some cases “beaten up,” by Big Labor agents, Congress sought to prevent monopoly-bargaining regimes from being installed when a majority of workers didn’t want one. Lauren McFerran, U.S. Supreme Court’s 1969 Gissel decision, Cemex Construction Materials Pacific, Hannaford Bros. Co., Flomatic Corp., and S.S. Logan Packing Co. , John P. Serpa and 1966 Aaron Brothers cases, Dominick Manoli, Linden Lumber,