Posts tagged Connecticut

    New Haven teachers contract calls for big pay increases for educators

    November 16, 2022 // NEW HAVEN —The city Board of Education approved a new contract with teachers that will increase salaries nearly 15 percent over three years and eventually raise the starting salary for new teachers to $51,421. The district did not immediately share the cost impact of the contract or the ratified document, saying corrections had to be made before it could be released.

    CT’s ‘captive audience’ law challenged in federal lawsuit

    November 2, 2022 // Connecticut’s ban on “captive audience” meetings, which unions say are used to thwart organizing, is unconstitutional and a preemption of federal labor law, a coalition led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce claimed in a lawsuit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Hartford. The lawsuit, joined by the Connecticut Business and Industry Association and trade groups representing retailers and others, says the ban violates free-speech and equal-protection rights under the Constitution by “chilling and prohibiting employer speech” with their workers. The defendants in the lawsuit are Commissioner Danté Bartolomeo of the state Department of Labor, the department itself, and Attorney General William Tong. Chris DiPentima,

    New Haven becomes first city in Conn. to recognize tenant unions

    September 27, 2022 // New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker signed an ordinance Tuesday afternoon officially recognizing tenant unions. This ordinance means unions can work with the city’s fair rent commission to investigate things such as proposed rent increases and unacceptable living conditions. This ordinance applies to properties with at least 10 rental units. It also extends to at least 10,000 housing units across the city.

    And Now the Union Would Like a Word in Private-Under Janus, government workers don’t have to join or pay. But behind closed doors it’s hard to say no

    September 13, 2022 // Four years after Janus, plenty of government employers haven’t explained to workers that union membership is not a condition of employment. Some employee handbooks still say workers must pay the union to keep their jobs. And many—if not most—public employees don’t know that a contract negotiated by the union applies to them whether they pay dues or not. Government-worker unions enjoy outsize influence over government. Governors, mayors, county executives and school superintendents facing demands for private access to their employees must remember how the unions wound up with the privileges that make them so powerful.

    Opinion: Connecticut teachers have choices; unions would do well to respect them

    August 16, 2022 // CEA leaders disparaged those who would suggest leaving the union. In emails this spring, they scolded teachers for even thinking of attending our online sessions. And of late, the CEA has resorted to having its lawyers make phone calls to teachers who’ve mailed in escape letters. Ironically, for some teachers this is the most attention the union has ever paid to them.

    Union Refuses To Aid Teacher Who Faced Termination for Criticism of Woke Training

    August 15, 2022 // A Connecticut gym teacher says his school threatened to fire him after he criticized its mandatory diversity training on "exploring privilege." But when he filed a grievance against the school, the local teachers' union dismissed the complaint without explanation. John Grande filed the grievance against Hartford Public Schools for what he called targeted discipline—including threats of termination and further "Sensitivity Awareness" training—but the American Federation of Teachers Local 1018, which has jurisdiction over this arbitration process for teachers, rejected his plea, his attorney told the Washington Free Beacon. Grande, who has been a gym teacher for 30 years, said the union retaliated against him for refusing to join the labor group. The training included an activity for teachers to split into groups and discuss their privilege in eight categories: class, ability, race, gender/sex, sexuality, nationality/citizenship, religion, and "other." Hartford Board of Education,

    Hartford teacher files complaint over union representation

    August 5, 2022 // According to the complaint filed by John Grande, “The Union breached its duty of fair representation when it refused to arbitrate a grievance on Complainant’s behalf due to the fact that he was not a member of the Union. Specifically, the Union’s First Vice President Corey Moses told Complainant that arbitration is reserved only for members of the Union.” The complaint alleges that HFT is violating state statute by not equally representing all members of the bargaining unit equally and that the union “committed a prohibited practice” by attempting to coerce membership through withholding services. Grande recently settled in federal court over a libel case in which he claimed a Hartford school principal defamed him by accusing him of threatening behavior. The case stemmed from Grande wearing headphones to block out noise because of his tinnitus. Hartford Board of Education,

    Unions Are Adding Some Heat in the Kitchen for Food & Beverage Employers

    July 27, 2022 // Food and beverage employers can take some important steps before a union-organizing effort that may not be available once an organizing drive begins. First, employers may want to establish effective lines of communication with their employees, including the utilization of a complaint procedure that is practical and efficient. Fostering a positive work culture that treats all employees with dignity and respect is crucial for maintaining effective communication. Second, employers may want to review their employee handbooks and related policies, such as open-door policies, solicitation policies, confidentiality policies, etc., to ensure they are up-to-date and legally compliant. Lastly, employers may want to consider training supervisors to identify and responding to union organizing in a lawful manner. Training can help avoid unfair labor practice charges that could result in significant costs for employers. food and beverage industry

    Teachers’ union abandons Connecticut children in backroom deal

    July 21, 2022 // In a stunning rebuke, the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) is raising the alarm about legislation altered before passage as the result of backroom negotiations between teacher’s union leaders and General Assembly leadership. They state, “Superintendents were blindsided as this piece of legislation was hidden from view. There was no transparency.” Ellington Board of Education, Ellington Superintendent Scott Nicol, Gifted and talented students, dual instruction, behavioral issues, Connecticut’s new law Public Act 22-80, “Concerning Mental and Physical Health Services in Schools”

    A Persistent Cook Serves Up a Winning Recipe for the First Amendment

    July 19, 2022 // An unexpected champion of the First Amendment against public-sector unions may inspire other Janus-curious government workers. Tina Curtis, the lead cook for the New Haven, Conn., Board of Education, may not have figured herself to be a First Amendment warrior. But by prevailing over her government-union bosses in what may prove to be an important Janus-rights case, she has shown herself to be exactly that. Curtis v. Hotel & Restaurant Employees & Bartenders Union, Local 217, AFL-CIO,