Posts tagged Association of Flight Attendants

    The ‘pro-union’ president risks the support of a key constituency to avert a rail strike

    December 5, 2022 // Biden faces a backlash from a core of rail workers and allied groups, as some of them see his push for a measure to avoid a strike as a betrayal. He signed the measure, which passed with bipartisan support, at the White House on Friday, giving rail workers a significant raise, but denying them the paid sick leave that had been a sticking point in some of the contract talks. Hours later, he arrived at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston and was met by scores of protesters objecting to his handling of a labor dispute that threatened to halt rail service at the peak of the holiday season.

    Worker protests at airports spread nationwide over staffing and pay

    September 27, 2022 // Cashiers, baristas, bartenders, cooks and lounge attendants at San Francisco International Airport launched an open-ended strike Monday over staffing levels and wages, shutting down most of one of the nation’s busiest airport’s food concessions. Flight attendants at United and Southwest airlines on Tuesday are expected to demonstrate at 21 airports around the United States, including Guam, as well as in London, to draw attention to workplace problems made worse by understaffing.

    Opinion: With Inflation High, Unions, Suppress Wages

    August 7, 2022 // Good luck getting a big raise if you’re in a union right now. That’s the unspoken message of a July 29 report from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. It showed that nonunion workers’ nominal pay in June was up 5.8% year over year, compared with only 3.8% for union workers’. The gap has been widening for a year. Why? Inflation. This divergence makes sense when you think of how union contracts operate. Unions negotiate long-term collective-bargaining agreements between workers and employers, with a typical contract lasting three to five years. That locks in the union’s gains but leaves it with little bargaining power or flexibility when something sudden or severe, like the current inflation, hits. So unless the contract is about to expire, union members are trapped when they need the freedom to negotiate better raises much faster.

    AFL-CIO unveils plan to grow but some union leaders underwhelmed

    June 17, 2022 // Shuler announced the creation of the Center for Transformational Organizing, a group of strategists, organizers and researcher who will focus on how to unionize new-economy companies. “We have a visionary way forward,” Shuler said. D Taylor, Mark Dimondstein,

    When Unions Harm Workers’ Ability to Get Raises

    June 13, 2022 // Starbucks no longer has the right to raise unilaterally the compensation for employees for those stores that have opted for unionization. By law, Starbucks can’t do that, and unions like it that way so that they can take credit for workers’ gains. This is not solely the union’s fault. It is baked into the outdated one-size-fits-all model of collective bargaining. This model is over a century old and was created for another time and workforce. Thankfully, the Employee Rights Act , sponsored by Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) and Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA), would address at least one of these issues. The ERA would allow unionized employers to give their employees raises without having to go through a union. Joe Thompson

    Big Labor is failing to meet the moment, advocates say

    April 15, 2022 // Institutional labor is out of touch, said one person familiar with the inner workings of the AFL-CIO who didn't want to publicly criticize their own organization. Too many union officers didn't start out as unionized workers — but instead rose through the ranks as staffers for the organization. "If you can't relate to the people you're representing, you're lost," the source said.

    Unions rally for striking Alabama miners

    April 8, 2022 // The miners began a strike more than a year ago against Warrior Met Coal in Brookwood. The UMWA organized a caravan today to show support for the miners, who union leadership said last week now number around 900. Members of the United Auto Workers, United Food and Commercial Workers, Association of Flight Attendants, and Unite Here were expected at the event.